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[identity profile] houseofchimeras.livejournal.com
Content warnings: none

On September 11th 2014, an article titled “O Is For… Otherkin” was posted on the website, Alphabet Britain. A website specifically for talking about unusual subcultures in Great Britain.

The article itself includes several interviews with various people. One of whom is Kim/Luna, who also appeared in the 2013 documentary, What?! I Think I'm An Animal.


Source -
Lucy, “O Is For… Otherkin.” 2014-7-11. Alphabet Britain. http://alphabetbritain.com/2014/09/o-otherkin/
frameacloud: A white dragon with its tail in a knot. (Heraldry transparent)
[personal profile] frameacloud


Trigger warnings: a skull, but it’s fake. Video shown above has loud melodramatic music.

July: A forty foot dragon skull appears to have washed ashore on a beach in Dorset, England. “In reality, it's a sculpture put together by Blinkbox to promote the third season of Game of Thrones […] It took a team of three sculptors over two months to design, construct, and paint.” The video shown above shows how the artists made the statue.



Source

George Dvorsky, “Did a massive dragon just wash ashore along England’s Jurassic coast?” 2013-07-18. io9. http://io9.com/did-a-massive-dragon-just-wash-ashore-along-englands-j-824242790
frameacloud: A white dragon with its tail in a knot. (Heraldry transparent)
[personal profile] frameacloud
Trigger warnings: None.

June: A UK official, Councillor Simon Parkes, has publicly stated that he believes that he has an extraterrestrial mother, and that he has fathered an extraterrestrial child. He has no concrete evidence that either of them exist. He's going to star in a documentary about his purportedly frequent contact with extraterrestrials. He states that he doesn't believe that this background interferes with his work on the council.

As far as I'm aware, Parkes hasn't participated in communities of people who identify as extraterrestrials (who call themselves starseeds) or other than human (otherkin).


Sources


Stuart Minting, "Whitby councillor claims to have fathered alien child." 2013-06-17. The Northern Echo. http://www.thenorthernecho.co.uk/news/10488568.Whitby_councillor_claims_to_have_fathered_alien_child/

"My 'mother' is a 9ft green alien, says councillor." 2012-03-23. The Scarborough News. http://www.thescarboroughnews.co.uk/news/local/my-mother-is-a-9ft-green-alien-says-councillor-1-4377481

idoubtit, "An extraterrestrial affair." 2013-06-19. Doubtful News. http://doubtfulnews.com/2013/06/an-extraterrestrial-affair/
frameacloud: A white dragon with its tail in a knot. (Heraldry transparent)
[personal profile] frameacloud
Trigger warnings: None.

June 2013: There's a call for otherkin, therianthropes, and vampires to participate in a study conducted by a researcher in the UK, named Ish’had Duncan,1 (MA Student at University of East London). The project is titled "Exploring The Experiences Of Otherkin, Vampires and Weres and Their Perceptions Of Therapy." Apparently, within a week, Duncan has already collected all six of the participants needed.2 Anyone who is interested in the project can e-mail Duncan.

- O. Scribner


Sources


1. "Identity Group Experiences & Perceptions Of Therapy: Vampires, Otherkin and Others." 2013-06-11. TheoFantastique. http://www.theofantastique.com/2013/06/11/identity-group-experiences-perceptions-of-therapy-vampires-otherkin-and-others/

2. Merticus. "Researching Identity Group Experiences & Perceptions Of Therapy." 2013-06-11. Vampire News. http://merticus.com/vampirenews/2013/06/11/researching-identity-group-experiences-perceptions-of-therapy/
frameacloud: A white dragon with its tail in a knot. (Heraldry transparent)
[personal profile] frameacloud
Trigger warnings: None.

Last May, George Monbiot's book Feral was published. An extract of the book was published in The Guardian, a British newspaper. The extract is about sightings of non-native big cats in Britain.1 Cryptozoologists (people who study sightings of questionably real animals, where we need more proof that these animals are real) call these sightings "mystery big cats" or "alien big cats." Monbiot wrote about the lack of proof for the mystery big cats:

"Of the photographs and fragments of footage I have seen, around half are evidently domestic cats. Roughly a quarter are cardboard cut-outs, cuddly toys, the result of crude Photoshopping or – as the surrounding vegetation reveals – pictures taken in the tropics. The remainder are so distant and indistinct that they could be anything: dogs, deer, foxes, bin liners, yetis on all fours. [...] That is about the extent of it: no photos, no captures, no dung, no corpses [...] not even a verifiable footprint. The Beasts of Britain have evaded police helicopters and armed response teams (it beats logging car crime), a five-week hunt by the Royal Marines, a succession of big cat experts and bounty hunters and the mass deployment of tracking, attracting and sensing technologies."2


There have been many sightings of mystery big cats, and many attempts to collect proof of them, but no proof has yet been found. Monbiot asks whether these sightings might represent some sort of wishful thinking. Doubtful News, a news blog that takes a skeptical look at supposedly paranormal current events, spoke approvingly of the book.3

The subject of mystery big cats is relevant to this blog. Around 2002, a big cat therianthrope named Barakus Leviathan expressed a belief that the mystery big cats might be therianthropes who can physically shape-shift into animal form.4 I have heard similar views expressed by therianthropes who have faith that physical shape-shifting might be possible.



Sources


1. George Monbiot, "Big-cat sightings: Is Britain suffering from mass hysteria?" 2013-05-21. The Guardian. http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/may/21/big-cat-sightings-mass-hysteria

2. Ibid.

3. Sharon Hill (idoubtit), "British big cats: Where's the evidence?" 2013-05-22. Doubtful News. http://doubtfulnews.com/2013/05/british-big-cats-wheres-the-evidence/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=british-big-cats-wheres-the-evidence

4. Barakus Leviathan, “A.B.C.: Alien Big Cats.” Circa 2002. The Draconcat. http://barakusdraconcat.tripod.com/id4.htm
[identity profile] merticus.livejournal.com
Would you like to take part in research about Otherkin, Vampires, and Therians/Weres and are over 18?

Ish’had Duncan (MA Student at University of East London) is seeking six self-identified Otherkin, Vampires and Therians/Weres to share their experiences for an interpretative phenomenological research project aimed at the education of therapists.

More Information:
http://merticus.com/vampirenews/2013/06/11/researching-identity-group-experiences-perceptions-of-therapy/
[identity profile] lost-shadowwolf.livejournal.com
Hey, just thought I would give you guys a heads up. I was just contacted by zigzag the production company that produced the recently otherkin documentary. They have informed me that the documentary will be aired in the U.K sometime in July on the TLC channel. Though you guys would want to know :)
frameacloud: A white dragon with its tail in a knot. (Heraldry transparent)
[personal profile] frameacloud
Trigger warnings: Publicity.

Caters News, which is “one of the UK’s biggest press agencies,” has sent messages to otherkin. Their e-mail, re-posted here, says only that Caters News wants to “help spread awareness of the subject,” without specifying what form of media it will use. (News articles? A TV show? Who knows?)

Thanks to Of Salfarro, an otherkin, for collecting and publicly re-posting that message.

- O. Scribner


Source


Of Salfarro, “Here we go again…” 2013-04-03. Otherkin. http://otherkin.livejournal.com/578268.html
[identity profile] lost-shadowwolf.livejournal.com
Hello all,

As I have read from your community I can tell your aware of a recentlyl documentary done by zigzag productions about otherkin. I participated in this documentary, though I have no actually seen it yet. I can only hope that from what questions I was asked and what things they were interested that my husband and I are not seen as complete idiots. I dont know anything about the other otherkins that were interviewed but I can speak for my husband and my self that while the whole process was a tad intrusive the reason why we choose to do it was for all the awakening kin out there that think they are alone. I had a feeling I would get a lot of flack from the otherkin community for doing this, which is fine as I didnt do it for them. I just wanted to say that my experience with the production team was that they asked very respectful and insightful questions, they were genuinely interested and never did anything my husband and I were not comfortable with. I hope I get a chance to watch it soon, though I can imagine watching my self on t.v will be a very odd experience.

Kimberly
aka Luna
frameacloud: A stylized green dragon person reading a book. (Default)
[personal profile] frameacloud
Trigger warnings: paranormal events and creatures. The linked article includes a disturbing photo of people dressed as blood-covered zombies.

Lincolnshire, England, 2011: According to the International Business Times, a member of the public named Alexis D. interviewed the Lincolnshire police to collect data on what kinds of emergencies of a paranormal nature had been reported to them from 2006 to 2011. He found that during this time, there were “nearly 1000 ‘paranormal’ activities reported to Lincolnshire Police over the past five years, with nearly two-thirds of these cases listed reports of ‘demons.’”

These included “2 reports of werewolves” and “5 reports of vampires,” by far in the minority.

The reports aren’t described in detail, but still provide some documentation of paranormal activity in the United Kingdom.

Source )
frameacloud: A white dragon with its tail in a knot. (Heraldry transparent)
[personal profile] frameacloud
Trigger warnings: none that I can think of.

November 15, 2011, Wales. The red dragon on the Welsh flag refers to an event from Arthurian legend, supposedly having taken place around the 5th century. In a battle between two dragons, the defending red dragon conquered the invading white dragon, which witness Merlin interpreted as a good omen.

The Arthurian legends often specify real locations where legendary events occurred. According to the legend, the dragon battle happened at the hill of Dinas Emrys, which is located in what is now an area of largely fallow farmland called Llyndy Isaf.

This November, the National Trust successfully raised £1 million to purchase Llyndy Isaf in order to protect it from commercial developers. It will be preserved for future generations as a wilderness area and park, with hiking trails and camp sites.

- O. Scribner

Sources


Welsh flag depicting red dragon.

Steven Morris, “Llyndy Isaf farm in Wales saved by National Trust after £1m appeal.” November 15, 2011. The Guardian. http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2011/nov/16/llyn-dinas-saved-by-national-trust

Image shown is the Welsh flag. This rendition by Tobias Jakobs is from a free open source clip art gallery, OpenClipArt.org. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Flag_of_Wales_2.svg
frameacloud: A white dragon with its tail in a knot. (Heraldry transparent)
[personal profile] frameacloud
Trigger warnings for these articles: disillusionment, ghosts. Work-safe.


Unicorn hoax revealed

The Ontario Science Center revealed that it ran a hoax in order to promote its new exhibit on “Mythic Creatures.” The hoax consisted of a video of a white horse posted on YouTube, encouraging people to debate whether it was real. The science center had also created a unicorn sighting hotline before letting people know that it was a publicity prank. Read more about the science center's unicorn hoax and see the video for yourself.


In UK, 755 friendly supernatural entities reported in past 25 years

Rev. Fanthorpe, “one [of] the UK’s leading authorities on the paranormal,” concluded research on the Supernatural Angel Report, having “found that in the past 25 years there have been a staggering 755 official reports [of friendly supernatural sightings] to police and councils in the UK.” These reports are of sightings or interactions with helpful or benign supernatural entities, and the numbers break down like this: “192 sighting of benign entities - ghosts which just appear and vanish without scaring viewers - 127 friendly entities, which smile or wave at people, 104 angelic visions, 99 helpful entities which actively help people who see them, 69 animal spirits, 44 sightings of fairies, 41 visions of saints, 32 of white witches, 24 guardian angels and 23 healing entities. Last month it was revealed in a study by the same organisation that there had been 227 ‘evil’ paranormal reports in the past 12 months in the UK.” It's a pleasant surprise to hear that pleasant ones are several times more frequent than malevolent ones.

- O. Scribner

Sources )

frameacloud: A stylized green dragon person reading a book. (Default)
[personal profile] frameacloud
Trigger warnings for this article: None that I can think of. Work-safe.

This upcoming summer, an artist in Wales will begin constructing a bronze statue of a dragon, resembling that on the country’s flag. The dragon itself will be 75 feet tall, perched on a skyscraper containing a museum. Those heights altogether would make it “the tallest public artwork in the UK.” The £6m project will be funded by commercial sponsors, not taxpayers’ money. See lots of pictures in the article.

Source )

frameacloud: A white dragon with its tail in a knot. (Heraldry transparent)
[personal profile] frameacloud
Trigger warnings for this article: description of intimidating creature. Work-safe.

          From the Birmingham Post: A paranormal researcher's study on sightings by region shows that in the past 25 years in the UK, 21 werewolf sightings have been reported.  I'm surprised; that's not all that rare.  I expected that there would be lots and lots of ghost stories and UFO sightings, but I would have thought there would be maybe only two or three werewolf stories.  The study includes a supposedly famous creature called the “Cannock Chase werewolf.”1
          This is subject matter quite at home in the cheesy supermarket tabloids (since it is a comment upon them), so I might as well take a look at The Sun's article about this study.  It which has a (simplified) map of the sightings by region, and has a little more to say about the creatures in question here: “Werewolves have turned up 21 times - all but one on Cannock Chase in Staffordshire. A paranormal group visited Cannock Chase in 1975 - and several of them claimed they saw the snarling beast rear up on its hind legs and run into bushes.”2  That sighting might have been one described in Nick Redfern's Memoirs of a Monster Hunter: A Five-Year Journey in Search of the Unknown, but I don't have a copy on hand to check.  Anyone familiar with this?

- O. Scribner

Sources )
frameacloud: A white dragon with its tail in a knot. (Heraldry transparent)
[personal profile] frameacloud
Trigger warnings for this article: none that I can think of. Work-safe.

Reported Sept. 8, 2009, in the Daily Mail, a British tabloid est. 1896: One night in 2007, Phyllis Bacon, a 55-year-old woman living in New Addington, near Croydon in South London, casually took a photograph of her garden without looking into the camera.  To her surprise, the photograph—shown in this news article—looks as though the flash has illuminated a fairy.  The light shape looks like a small creature flying through the air, with wings, legs, and a head with antennae.  Either it has awfully long arms, or it’s carrying something crosswise.1

To me, the fairy in this photograph looks like it’s not real… but not an intentional fake, either.  It’s probably just a blur caused by a slightly shaky camera and a long exposure.  Compare another photo with a similar apparition, where a winged angel seems to be standing beside a girl on stage, analyzed by the skeptical blog Forgetomori.2  There are other floating white dots in the “Croydon Tinker Bell” photo, and one of them has a double-image look to it, suggesting that the fairy is indeed an artifact of long-exposure blur.

I wonder what these motes are?  Insects, perhaps, or cottonwood, or snowflakes.  The photographer didn’t say what time of the year it was, and that would make a difference.  

That said, this “fairy” is a pretty neat-looking example of an accidental film artifact.  I’m impressed at just how fairy-shaped it is.  I’d sure be tickled to see one of my photos come out with a fun surprise in it like this.

Years ago, I remember happening across a website about artifacts that mysteriously appear in photos.  (Unhelpfully, I have no idea of the site’s name, or where to look for it now.)  Most of them looked an awful lot like dust on the lens or the flash, or a hair hanging into the frame… rather boring.  None of them looked so intriguing as this one!  The people running the website believed that these motes represented paranormal activity, or that a spirit had been present at the time when the photo was taken.  I suppose they would look at this photo and say, “Yes, there are indeed ‘motes’ in this photo, but they are fairies, too, and not cottonwood at all.”

- O. Scribner

Sources )

frameacloud: A white dragon with its tail in a knot. (Heraldry transparent)
[personal profile] frameacloud
Trigger warnings for this article: description of violence in a folktale about the slaying of a dragon. Safe for work.

           May 27, 2009: In South Yorkshire, England, a new statue of a famous dragon was unveiled.1  It stands in a forest across from the cavernous crags (Wharncliffe Chase) that were said to be the home of the Dragon of Wantley, from a 17th century comedic play.2

The statue’s serpentine body is similar to an old-fashioned dry stone wall, meandering 15 meters (16.4 yards)3 before terminating in a large elm-wood head.  (See a photo of the statue4 on the site of Stone To Steel, a project working to preserve the region’s history.)  The wall portion was assembled by John Alston, and the head was carved by Mark Bell.5

To begin with, the Dragon of Wantley seems to have been a resident of folklore, not of myth.  Folktales are stories considered to be fictional by their culture of origin, whereas myth and legend are those stories thought by their tellers to be true.  (Myth is religious, and legend is historical.)6  The dragon’s tale was written to make fun of other dragon-slaying stories, as well as to mock contemporary figures; the contemporaries who understood this never believed that it was real.  In meaning, the play The Dragon of Wantley is now thought to have been an unflattering caricature of a current politician, or a satire of a recent court case in which a much-loathed lawyer was defeated.  However, when this context was later forgotten, the story was taken seriously, and so passed into legend.

Woodblock print of More kicking the Wantley Dragon.

The story of The Dragon of Wantley originated in 1685 as a burlesque opera.  Its satirical tone is clear: unlike dragon-slayers who are usually written as pure and holy, this knight is hedonistic, a drunk and a womanizer.  More of More Hall defeats the dragon not in the manner of saints and heroes (by the sign of the cross, a lance in the throat, or decapitation) but in an undignified manner: by wearing spiked armor, and kicking the dragon to death.7

Specifically, More kicked the dragon’s behind, as shown in the woodblock illustration that usually accompanies the poem (shown to the right).  The version most commonly reprinted now is the censored one published by Thomas Percy, which says this dragon’s one vulnerable place was instead its mouth, and omits several verses of base humor.  You can read the poem in both its permutations, being forewarned that even the cleaned-up one retains enough of its comedic character that it has the ability to offend (for example, with the terrible rhyme “Do but slay this dragon, who won't leave us a rag on”).8 

In 1892, The Dragon of Wantley was loosely adapted into an illustrated novel, similarly irreverent in tone, although the dragon expires in an altogether different manner.  By its vintage, it has passed into the public domain, so you can read the novel9 through Project Gutenberg, an online library of free public-domain e-books.

It’s appropriate that there is a statue of the Wantley Dragon on the very site described in its story.  The new statue of the Dragon of Wantley is different from other statues of famous dragons.  Take a look at it,10 it’s no delicate-featured bronze.  However, a folk craft such as chainsaw sculpture perfectly suits the character of the story it celebrates.

- O. Scribner

Sources )

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